La Lucia by ARRCC Interior Design

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Discover La Lucia, the latest interior design project in Durban, South Africa by ARRCC Interior Design. Inspired by its surroundings, bleached driftwood and the sandy beach, the interior creates a direct relationship with the environment. 

The surrounding beauty of the environment inspired so much of the design. As designers we are passionate about creating spaces that reflect both the location and our clients – that is how life-enhancing spaces are crafted. – Mark Rielly, ARRCC Director

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Materials chosen for the external spaces echo bleached driftwood and the sandy beach. Weathered iroko decking and ceiling slats, honed sandstone and polished light coloured concrete floors form the predominant materials and create a direct relationship with the surrounding environment. The interiors express simplicity and restraint while making the home comfortable and cosy. Sand-coloured polished concrete floors, bleached timber, natural leathers and grey linens are anchored by soft neutrals and countered with touches of colour accents. The four sea-facing bedrooms are located on the upper level and open onto private individual terraces. When closed, the aluminium screens add an interesting design element to this level. The soft neutrals mixed with teal and azure are repeated throughout the house to emphasize the beachy relaxed tone and setting. Bleached timber, natural leathers and grey linens are anchored by soft neutrals and countered with touches of charcoal, teal and azure. The master bathroom, with a sandblasted shower screen and sandstone clad vertical wall, provides the perfect haven for relaxation whilst still echoing the soft neutral palette seen throughout the house. Large glass windows frame the view out onto the master terrace, where skylights add soft natural lighting. The East sea-facing façade is ‘wrapped’ with a series of bronzed anodised aluminium sliding screens that cocoon the structure entirely or in part. The screens are patterned to abstractly mimic the surrounding milkwood trees. – from ARRCC

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